Some Semple advice

Knitted mouse

Set those Trojan Mice running

Shirley Ayres recently recommended a book on Twitter – Organizations Don’t Tweet, People Do – by Euan Semple. It’s excellent, split into succinct chapters in a readable style.

From my first read-through (I love rereading books), ten points have jumped out at me:

  • we’re seeing a cultural change, not a technological one
  • create “Trojan Mice” – small, nimble projects – and watch where they go
  • “Sharing what you know doesn’t diminish its worth but instead increases its value.”
  • the more you blog the better you get at it – but writing an effective post is a skill
  • stand up for your opinions and don’t be afraid of criticism
  • if it turns out that you don’t know what you’re talking about, embrace it as a learning opportunity
  • help people in your network and it will always be reciprocated
  • digital natives will expect access to social media at work – and links to their professional networks will help them do their job
  • crowdsource social media (and other) guidelines and make them enabling, not simply “Thou shalt not”
  • social tools can come into their own during a disaster or crisis – but you need to build your network in advance if it’s going to be effective.
It’s good advice. Now where did that mouse go?

 

Photo: Mouse by Anifan via Flickr

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6 comments

    1. Thanks Mark, it’s a very good book – one that you want to share with people (but not necessarily your own copy in case it never comes back!). I like that fact that as well as some good, practical advice it also gently nudges you to consider your own behaviour and attitudes to work and the use of social tools.

      Glad you like my choice of mouse too. As soon as I saw him on Flickr I knew he was the one 🙂

  1. A few years ago a thought struck me. How better things are when we share. Talk to one another. Learn from each other. I think this is party of the cultural change mentioned above. I certainly felt it. One question though, what is a Trojan Mouse? I’m building a sort of wiki style, user generated content website around my favourite hobby. Could this be a trojan mouse?

    1. Hello Peter, thank you for commenting. Like you, I’m all for the sharing of knowledge and ideas – it’s definitely a cultural shift that seems to be gaining pace. As part of this, I love the fact that (often low or no cost) unconferences are spreading further and faster. Watching an agenda take shape from suggestions from attendees is a real thrill. You never know what you’re going to get, and that’s exciting.

      Euan Semple devotes a chapter in his book to Trojan Mice. His introduction to the chapter reads: “Instead of having expensive tools or large scale change initiatives, have lots of small ones. Small things that don’t require a lot of budget or permission from too many people but that will work away together to achieve significant benefits.” The book addresses organisational uses of Trojan Mice, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t also fit around hobbies if something is created that gets people talking, sharing and debating an issue that they all share an interest in.

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